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Mediapitek

..while burning my life in social media

Posts tagged Technology

Sep 10 '14
Apr 17 '14
lifeandcode:

kemosabi76:

Thank you!

AWWWWWWWWW YEAHHHHHHHHHH  THIS GUY

lifeandcode:

kemosabi76:

Thank you!

AWWWWWWWWW YEAHHHHHHHHHH  THIS GUY

Apr 1 '14
nprfreshair:

Check out Alexis Madrigal's latest article in The Atlantic, How Twitter Has Changed Over the Years in 12 Charts
He’s also the Fresh Air tech contributor. You can read/listen to his pieces here.

nprfreshair:

Check out Alexis Madrigal's latest article in The Atlantic, How Twitter Has Changed Over the Years in 12 Charts

He’s also the Fresh Air tech contributor. You can read/listen to his pieces here.

Jan 16 '14
theatlantic:

We Hacked North Korea with Balloons and USB Drives

PAJU, South Korea — At the base of a mountain almost two miles from the North Korean border, the giant helium balloons slowly float upward, borne by a stiff, cold wind. These are not balloons in the conventional sense—the transparent, cylindrical tubes covered in colorful Korean script are more than 20 feet in length and each carries three large bundles wrapped in plastic. The characters painted on one of the balloons reads, “The regime must fall.”
The launch site is at the confluence of the Imjin and Han Rivers, which form the border with North Korea. From here, it’s possible to see the Potemkin village constructed on the shores across the river. The picturesque agrarian hamlet is really just a series of uninhabited sham structures, which contrast sharply with the bustle and industry of the South Korean side. Using binoculars we can see people “walking” back and forth and pretending to till the land despite below-freezing temperatures.
We’re here to hack the North Korean government’s monopoly of information above the 38th parallel on the Korean peninsula. The North Korean dictatorship continues to be one of the most totalitarian regimes on the planet. While other regimes oppress their dissidents and censor the Internet, North Korea has no dissidents and no connection to the outside world. It has no Internet. The Kim family rules with absolute authority, arbitrarily imprisoning or executing anyone who stands in their way. The regime goes even further; not only is the offender imprisoned, but entire generations of his family are also sent to the gulags. The embargo of information into and out of the country has forced human rights groups to be creative in their methods of reaching North Korean citizens.
Read more. [Image: Reuters/Kim Hong-Ji]

theatlantic:

We Hacked North Korea with Balloons and USB Drives

PAJU, South Korea — At the base of a mountain almost two miles from the North Korean border, the giant helium balloons slowly float upward, borne by a stiff, cold wind. These are not balloons in the conventional sense—the transparent, cylindrical tubes covered in colorful Korean script are more than 20 feet in length and each carries three large bundles wrapped in plastic. The characters painted on one of the balloons reads, “The regime must fall.”

The launch site is at the confluence of the Imjin and Han Rivers, which form the border with North Korea. From here, it’s possible to see the Potemkin village constructed on the shores across the river. The picturesque agrarian hamlet is really just a series of uninhabited sham structures, which contrast sharply with the bustle and industry of the South Korean side. Using binoculars we can see people “walking” back and forth and pretending to till the land despite below-freezing temperatures.

We’re here to hack the North Korean government’s monopoly of information above the 38th parallel on the Korean peninsula. The North Korean dictatorship continues to be one of the most totalitarian regimes on the planet. While other regimes oppress their dissidents and censor the Internet, North Korea has no dissidents and no connection to the outside world. It has no Internet. The Kim family rules with absolute authority, arbitrarily imprisoning or executing anyone who stands in their way. The regime goes even further; not only is the offender imprisoned, but entire generations of his family are also sent to the gulags. The embargo of information into and out of the country has forced human rights groups to be creative in their methods of reaching North Korean citizens.

Read more. [Image: Reuters/Kim Hong-Ji]

Jan 10 '14
Here’s a look at how much has changed in consumer electronics since 2005 from Pew. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-how-technology-has-changed-in-the-last-8-years-2014-1#ixzz2q0P6u7xM

Here’s a look at how much has changed in consumer electronics since 2005 from Pew. 

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-how-technology-has-changed-in-the-last-8-years-2014-1#ixzz2q0P6u7xM

Jan 1 '14

instagram:

Ringing in 2014 on Instagram

To see more photos and videos from some of the biggest New Year’s Eve celebrations around the world so far, check out the location pages for the Auckland Sky Tower, Sydney Opera House, Kuala Lumpur City Center Park and Victoria Harbour (維多利亞港).

As the year draws to a close across the timezones, crowds are gathering around the world for firework displays and parties at some of the globe’s most famous landmarks.

Want to see photos and videos from New Year’s Eve celebrations in your city? Try searching your city or landmark’s name on Instagram with a hashtag in front of it (eg. #singapore or #timessquare). If you find a photo or video with a location tag, tap the blue text above the photo or video to see even more.

Dec 30 '13

The Future of Display Technology, Samsung’s Version

Dec 22 '13
"Sometime in the past few years, the blog died. In 2014, people will finally notice. Sure, blogs still exist, many of them are excellent, and they will go on existing and being excellent for many years to come. But the function of the blog, the nebulous informational task we all agreed the blog was fulfilling for the past decade, is increasingly being handled by a growing number of disparate media forms that are blog-like but also decidedly not blogs.

Instead of blogging, people are posting to Tumblr, tweeting, pinning things to their board, posting to Reddit, Snapchatting, updating Facebook statuses, Instagramming, and publishing on Medium. In 1997, wired teens created online diaries, and in 2004 the blog was king. Today, teens are about as likely to start a blog (over Instagramming or Snapchatting) as they are to buy a music CD. Blogs are for 40-somethings with kids."

Jason Kottke, Nieman Journalism Lab. The blog is dead, long live the blog.

Jason’s article is part of a series of Nieman predictions for journalism in 2014.

(via futurejournalismproject)

Dec 5 '13
theatlantic:

How to Make Money Off of Internet Lovin’

Two billion dollars. That’s how much online dating companies are expected to make in 2013 by helping lonely hearts find love on the Internet. The industry has been growing steadily for half a decade, so it’s no wonder that older digital yentas like Match.com and eHarmony.com are seeing competition from app startups like the enthusiastic Let’s Date, the gay and bisexual service Grindr, and the somewhat-forward Down (if you must ask the question “to do what?”, maybe you’re better off sticking with eHarmony). A number of these kinds of apps have earned the reputation of being meant for hook-ups rather than dating, whereas eHarmony and Match.com emphasize just the opposite: Both sites often crow about the number of marriages that started on their sites.
Hinge wants to be somewhere in the middle. It’s a “social app” that helps people find and rate friends of people they know on Facebook, which they say is better than the free-for-all on sites like OkCupid. ”Our goal is to create more high-potential first dates,” said the company’s founder, Justin McLeod, at The Atlantic's forum on small business on Wednesday.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

theatlantic:

How to Make Money Off of Internet Lovin’

Two billion dollars. That’s how much online dating companies are expected to make in 2013 by helping lonely hearts find love on the Internet. The industry has been growing steadily for half a decade, so it’s no wonder that older digital yentas like Match.com and eHarmony.com are seeing competition from app startups like the enthusiastic Let’s Date, the gay and bisexual service Grindr, and the somewhat-forward Down (if you must ask the question “to do what?”, maybe you’re better off sticking with eHarmony). A number of these kinds of apps have earned the reputation of being meant for hook-ups rather than dating, whereas eHarmony and Match.com emphasize just the opposite: Both sites often crow about the number of marriages that started on their sites.

Hinge wants to be somewhere in the middle. It’s a “social app” that helps people find and rate friends of people they know on Facebook, which they say is better than the free-for-all on sites like OkCupid. ”Our goal is to create more high-potential first dates,” said the company’s founder, Justin McLeod, at The Atlantic's forum on small business on Wednesday.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

Dec 5 '13
theatlantic:

How to Take a Picture of a Single, Ultra-Magnified Snow Flake

No two snowflakes are alike, they say. And yet: We rarely get proof of that. Our eyes perceive snow not as individual, idiosyncratic crystals … but rather as uniformly fluffy flakes. And! When we try to get a better look at the true intricacy of snow by capturing one of the flakes … the thing melts. Snow is a cold and fickle thing. 
Unless, that is, you are a photographer in the tradition of Wilson Bentley—one of the photographers who specializes in the highly technical art of snowflake imagery. The photographer Alexey Kljatov is one of those. And his Flickr page is full of close-up, highly magnified shots of snow flakes—dainty structures whose variety hints at the mind-boggling range of the humble, ephemeral flake.
And: You could take similar shots! If, that is, you have a fancy camera, some household tools, and a DIY attitude. You need, first of all, a glass surface, lighted by either an LED flashlight or natural light. (In the latter case, you need a dark background that will maximize the visibility of the flakes: Kljatov likes dark, woolen fabrics.) 
Read more. [Image: Flickr/chaoticmind75]

theatlantic:

How to Take a Picture of a Single, Ultra-Magnified Snow Flake

No two snowflakes are alike, they say. And yet: We rarely get proof of that. Our eyes perceive snow not as individual, idiosyncratic crystals … but rather as uniformly fluffy flakes. And! When we try to get a better look at the true intricacy of snow by capturing one of the flakes … the thing melts. Snow is a cold and fickle thing. 

Unless, that is, you are a photographer in the tradition of Wilson Bentley—one of the photographers who specializes in the highly technical art of snowflake imagery. The photographer Alexey Kljatov is one of those. And his Flickr page is full of close-up, highly magnified shots of snow flakes—dainty structures whose variety hints at the mind-boggling range of the humble, ephemeral flake.

And: You could take similar shots! If, that is, you have a fancy camera, some household tools, and a DIY attitude. You need, first of all, a glass surface, lighted by either an LED flashlight or natural light. (In the latter case, you need a dark background that will maximize the visibility of the flakes: Kljatov likes dark, woolen fabrics.)

Read more. [Image: Flickr/chaoticmind75]