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Mediapitek

..while burning my life in social media

Posts tagged Twitter

Apr 1 '14
nprfreshair:

Check out Alexis Madrigal's latest article in The Atlantic, How Twitter Has Changed Over the Years in 12 Charts
He’s also the Fresh Air tech contributor. You can read/listen to his pieces here.

nprfreshair:

Check out Alexis Madrigal's latest article in The Atlantic, How Twitter Has Changed Over the Years in 12 Charts

He’s also the Fresh Air tech contributor. You can read/listen to his pieces here.

Mar 23 '14
futurejournalismproject:

As Turkey Bans Twitter, Twitter Use Surges
Turkey banned Twitter Thursday night because of “biases" and "systematic character assassinations" it says take place on the network. Namely, that people are sharing audio recordings and other evidence of alleged mass corruption in the Erdogan government.
Despite the ban, or maybe because of it, Twitter use within Turkey just skyrocketed. Via Venture Beat:

After banning Twitter last night, the actions of Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan have failed spectacularly.
Immediately following Turkey’s ban, Twitter issued an SMS workaround. Then, ”#TwitterisblockedinTurkey” became a globally trending topic on Twitter. Into the night, usage of Google’s free DNS service exploded to circumvent the blockage of Twitter’s domain. Now, social media analysis firms Brandwatch and We Are Social report that Turkish tweets last night and this morning are up by a massive 138 percent…
…Turkish users collectively tweeted 2.5 million times since the ban went into effect, potentially “setting new records for Twitter use in the country,” according to a different study reported by the Guardian.

As Zeynep Tufekci explains, people in Turkey “banned the ban” by sharing tips on using proxies and adjusting DNS settings to get around government blocking:

By the end of the evening, I repeated the same line in interviews and also on Twitter: the only people “banned” from Twitter are pro-government supporters not wanting to openly circumvent. But then even some of them started popping up, arguing the ban must be a mistake or a devious plot by the opponents in the judiciary where they had been battling a faction. It was 3 am in Turkey and it seemed that many people on my Twitter list, who normally would be asleep by then, were awake, rejoicing in the freedom they’d clutched. They were not going to let go. Jokes were proliferating about the weakness of the ban, the fact that pro-government supporters had mostly decided to stay away, and the fact that the prolific Tweeter and mayor of Ankara from the ruling party had not been able to resist the temptation. He had circumvented.

Image: A woman paints Google’s Public DNS on her body, a method being used to get around Turkey’s Twitter ban, via @_cypherpunks_. Related, graffiti in Turkey is appearing that promotes the same.  

futurejournalismproject:

As Turkey Bans Twitter, Twitter Use Surges

Turkey banned Twitter Thursday night because of “biases" and "systematic character assassinations" it says take place on the network. Namely, that people are sharing audio recordings and other evidence of alleged mass corruption in the Erdogan government.

Despite the ban, or maybe because of it, Twitter use within Turkey just skyrocketed. Via Venture Beat:

After banning Twitter last night, the actions of Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan have failed spectacularly.

Immediately following Turkey’s ban, Twitter issued an SMS workaround. Then, ”#TwitterisblockedinTurkey” became a globally trending topic on Twitter. Into the night, usage of Google’s free DNS service exploded to circumvent the blockage of Twitter’s domain. Now, social media analysis firms Brandwatch and We Are Social report that Turkish tweets last night and this morning are up by a massive 138 percent…

…Turkish users collectively tweeted 2.5 million times since the ban went into effect, potentially “setting new records for Twitter use in the country,” according to a different study reported by the Guardian.

As Zeynep Tufekci explains, people in Turkey “banned the ban” by sharing tips on using proxies and adjusting DNS settings to get around government blocking:

By the end of the evening, I repeated the same line in interviews and also on Twitter: the only people “banned” from Twitter are pro-government supporters not wanting to openly circumvent. But then even some of them started popping up, arguing the ban must be a mistake or a devious plot by the opponents in the judiciary where they had been battling a faction. It was 3 am in Turkey and it seemed that many people on my Twitter list, who normally would be asleep by then, were awake, rejoicing in the freedom they’d clutched. They were not going to let go. Jokes were proliferating about the weakness of the ban, the fact that pro-government supporters had mostly decided to stay away, and the fact that the prolific Tweeter and mayor of Ankara from the ruling party had not been able to resist the temptation. He had circumvented.

Image: A woman paints Google’s Public DNS on her body, a method being used to get around Turkey’s Twitter ban, via @_cypherpunks_. Related, graffiti in Turkey is appearing that promotes the same.  

Mar 21 '14
Dec 13 '13
theatlantic:

Facebook is the News, in 2 Charts

Facebook dwarfs all other social news distribution outlets, even Twitter.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

theatlantic:

Facebook is the News, in 2 Charts

Facebook dwarfs all other social news distribution outlets, even Twitter.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

Nov 23 '13
theatlantic:

We’ve Found the One Thing Elon Musk Doesn’t Understand: How the News Works

Arguably the brightest innovator alive, Elon Musk took to Twitter a couple of days ago to ask the world a question:
"Why does a Tesla fire w no injury get more media headlines than 100,000 gas car fires that kill 100s of people per year?"
Good question. Why do the "unjust" headlines so misrepresent the facts?
Saying he feels “pistol-whipped” by the recent coverage, Musk joins a long tradition of accomplished CEOs who bristle about the “illogical” behavior of the news media. Those bristlers have usually mastered the specific logic of their own field—say, business, law or science—and have unconsciously come to believe that the logic of their field can and should be applied universally. Often faced with public criticism for the first time in their careers, they tend to reject news logic as irrational, and view the negative reports as "unjust" personal mistreatment.  Some spend their entire careers fighting against the laws of news, while others eventually learn to use those laws to their own advantage.
So, what are the laws of news logic that explain why a Tesla fire does indeed get more headlines? Here are the top five.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

theatlantic:

We’ve Found the One Thing Elon Musk Doesn’t Understand: How the News Works

Arguably the brightest innovator alive, Elon Musk took to Twitter a couple of days ago to ask the world a question:

"Why does a Tesla fire w no injury get more media headlines than 100,000 gas car fires that kill 100s of people per year?"

Good question. Why do the "unjust" headlines so misrepresent the facts?

Saying he feels “pistol-whipped” by the recent coverage, Musk joins a long tradition of accomplished CEOs who bristle about the “illogical” behavior of the news media. Those bristlers have usually mastered the specific logic of their own field—say, business, law or science—and have unconsciously come to believe that the logic of their field can and should be applied universally. Often faced with public criticism for the first time in their careers, they tend to reject news logic as irrational, and view the negative reports as "unjust" personal mistreatment.  Some spend their entire careers fighting against the laws of news, while others eventually learn to use those laws to their own advantage.

So, what are the laws of news logic that explain why a Tesla fire does indeed get more headlines? Here are the top five.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

Oct 29 '13
Social Media Explained

Social Media Explained

Sep 9 '13
Jul 25 '13
Infographic: how world leaders connect on Twitter

Infographic: how world leaders connect on Twitter

Jun 5 '13
newsweek:

#OccupyGezi 
[Artist unknown…if you know who made this, tell us! h/t Meg & Mike]

newsweek:

#OccupyGezi

[Artist unknown…if you know who made this, tell ush/t Meg & Mike]

Apr 15 '13
Who Uses Social Media? A Demographic Breakdown
A new study from the Pew Research Center and Docstoc shed some light on just who uses social and on what platforms.
Women use social media 9% more than men do. Despite having more distractions, people living in cities have the most social media activity, at 70% of the population. 
And in a strange twist, despite being somewhat economically disadvantaged, 72% of adults with annual household incomes below $30,000 use social networks, more than those with higher wages.
How about most popular social networks? That would be Facebook, with 67% of adults using the Zuckerberg-founded service. A distant second was LinkedIn with 20%, with Twitter coming in third at 16%, and Tumblr falling dead last at 6%.

Who Uses Social Media? A Demographic Breakdown

A new study from the Pew Research Center and Docstoc shed some light on just who uses social and on what platforms.

Women use social media 9% more than men do. Despite having more distractions, people living in cities have the most social media activity, at 70% of the population. 

And in a strange twist, despite being somewhat economically disadvantaged, 72% of adults with annual household incomes below $30,000 use social networks, more than those with higher wages.

How about most popular social networks? That would be Facebook, with 67% of adults using the Zuckerberg-founded service. A distant second was LinkedIn with 20%, with Twitter coming in third at 16%, and Tumblr falling dead last at 6%.